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How to Get a Social Security Card

For almost everything, you will need a social security card: to open a bank account, apply for a driving license, and more.

Some expats often assume they won’t be eligible for a number because they’re not American-born or a proper US citizen, but they are wrong.

For example, if you have a student or work visa, it’s very probable that you will not have trouble signing up. (You can visit the website of social security www.socialsecurity.gov for more information about it)

In the process of getting a Social Security Card you will definitely need your passport, visa and any supporting documentation, not photocopies, they ask for the originals.

If you are age 18 or older, you can apply for a social security number. The US government will use the same information that you gave to apply for an immigrant visa to apply for a Social Security Number. Your social security card will arrive at your mailing address about three weeks after you arrive in the US.

If you are not an immigrant or did not apply for a Social Security number when you applied for an immigrant visa, you must have your papers from DHS (work permission) showing your immigration status and authorization to work in the United States.

After that, you should apply for a Social Security number and card by visiting a Social Security office in the US.

Information Required to Get a Social Security Card

  • Application For A Social Security Card (Form SS-5)
  • Two original documents proving your identity and immigration status, work eligibility, and age.

A work permit can be used as proof of both your identity and work-authorized immigration status. Your birth certificate or passport may serve as proof of age. However, you need two separate documents to prove eligibility for a Social Security Number.

To Remember: Applying for a SSN is free.

Beltran Brito LLP is an immigration law firm representing individuals and businesses around the U.S. and the world with immigration attorneys who are dedicated to assisting clients in all aspects of U.S. immigration and nationality law.

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This post is also available in: Spanish

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